CRN HERITAGE
OUR PAST, OUR KNOWLEDGE

60's

In 1963, founder Sanzio Nicolini boldly embarked on a challenging journey of adventure. His cutting-edge approach – building high-end luxury yachts in steel and aluminium for a demanding, select clientele – has borne considerable fruit. In the ’60s, CRN yachts ranged from 15 to 20 metres in length, sporting an instantly recognisable design. The first 23-metre project, Super Conero, led to ever larger, more prestigious vessels built in partnership with major designers who helped to forge CRN’s international reputation.

In the ’70s, CRN yachts’ signature lines became a leitmotif that has endured to the present day. The boats continued inexorably to grow, often anticipating the needs of an increasingly complex market. Sanzio Nicolini and Carlo Riva began to collaborate to great effect. Between 1970 and 1978, CRN also built eight vessels for Riva: six Marco Polos, inspired by the Super Conero, and two Vespuccis, one of which became Carlo Riva’s personal yacht. This partnership between the two great innovators, Nicolini and Riva, was a key moment for their companies and for the Italian pleasure-yacht industry in general. In 1978, CRN built its first yacht of over 45 metres: the 47.2-m Fath Al Khair, for an emir in the Middle East. This was an outlet that continued to develop in the following decade.

CRN’s clients in the '80s were mostly Greek owners and Middle Eastern royalty, who sought increasingly large yachts, now ranging from 32 to 61 metres in length. 1983 was a pivotal time in CRN’s history. This was the year when CRN delivered the F100, a 32.8-metre yacht designed by Gerhard Gilgenast for Gianni Agnelli, head of the famous Italian car-making dynasty. The F100 was the most advanced vessel that the yard had yet built, foreshadowing a type of yacht that would be all the rage two decades later. Her unmistakable svelte lines by Gilgenast helped to launch the “minimalist” movement in contemporary yacht design. She was an extremely robust, comfortable craft well-suited to long cruises in all weathers, the first yacht with floating rubber supports, making for a delightfully quiet ride. This was also the first recreational explorer yacht. Another milestone during these years was the 47-metre Azzurra, constructed for an American client in 1988 with interiors by Paola Smith, a major name in interior design stateside.

CRN’s clients were mostly from the Middle East, a region that had entered a period of unprecedented turmoil, starting with the Gulf War as the decade dawned. CRN elected to diversify its operations to include refitting and the purely commercial side. Vessels of considerable size were launched, including Awal II (65 metres, 1990), Maracunda (50 metres, 1990), Lady Anne PB (40 metres, 1994), Pegaso (48 metres, 1996), Sahab IV (50 metres, 1997), Pestifer (50 metres, 1998) and Numptia (61 metres, 2000), the last craft to be made by CRN during this decade, coinciding with the change in ownership that was bound to alter the Shipyard’s destiny. Numptia featured a decidedly ‘rounded stern, designed by CRN in cooperation with Studio Scanu, which made it immediately famous throughout the world.

In 2002 CRN reached a new milestone which would further enhance its know-how and production capacity: the acquisition of the adjacent shipyard Mario Morini, a historical name in shipbuilding. Morini’s experience in steel construction, gained through its production of commercial, merchant and military vessels, perfectly matched CRN’s needs and the union between the two shipyards led to the creation of an impressive operation with an 80-thousand-square-metre site with a large private marine andbecoming one of the largest shipyard in Europe. In this step CRN has further expanded its portfolio and diversified its production, to combine its traditional steel and aluminium vessels with new composite ones. And it was so that CRN’s successful composite megayacht lines 128’ (40 metres) and Navetta 43 (43 metres) were born. Up to five pleasure vessels were now being launched every year and CRN’s fleet was growing fast, together with its fame. Kooilust Mare (2003) and Saramour (2005) were two 46-metre yachts inspired by Magnifica, once again designed by Nuvolari & Lenard, and the idea of ‘fully-custom’ megayachts, built on the same naval platform, was now beginning to take on. It was then that the cooperation with architectural firm Zuccon International Project began, the first result of which was 54m Ability in 2006. Other yachts built in the following years included Givi (60 metres – in 2007), Maraya (54 metres – in 2007), Romance (57 metres - in 2008), Tacanuyaso MS (60 metres – in 2008), Blue Eyes (60 metres – in 2009), Mimtee (60 metres – in 2010) and Darlings Danama (60 metres – in 2011).

In 1983, CRN delivered the F100, a 32.8-metre yacht designed by Gerhard Gilgenast for Gianni Agnelli, head of the famous Italian car-making dynasty. It was an adventure that defined CRN’s future and gave the company huge impetus. The F100 was the most advanced vessel that the yard had yet built; she foreshadowed a type of yacht that would be all the rage twenty years later. Her unmistakable svelte lines by Gilgenast helped to launch the “minimalist” movement in contemporary yacht design. She was an extremely robust, comfortable craft well-suited to long cruises in all weathers, the first yacht with floating rubber supports for a delightfully quiet ride. This was also the first recreational explorer yacht. The F100’s groundbreaking design would prove inspirational, paving the way for many others to follow.

1964

In 1963, founder Sanzio Nicolini boldly embarked on a challenging journey of adventure. His cutting-edge approach – building high-end luxury yachts in steel and aluminium for a demanding, select clientele – has borne considerable fruit. In the ’60s, CRN yachts ranged from 15 to 20 metres in length, sporting an instantly recognisable design. The first 23-metre project, Super Conero, led to ever larger, more prestigious vessels built in partnership with major designers who helped to forge CRN’s international reputation.

Galatea

9,6 m h.001

Steel/Aluminum

Delfino II

12,5 m h.002

Steel/Aluminum

1965

M/V Micoperi I

10,4 m h.004

Steel/Aluminum

M/V Micoperi II

10,4 m h.005

Steel/Aluminum

White Queen II

14,35 m h.006

Steel/Aluminum

Mipi Mao

19,43 m h.007

Steel/Aluminum

Lidymar

19,23 m h.008

Steel/Aluminum

P.I

14,35 m h.009

Steel/Aluminum

P.II

14,35 m h.010

Steel/Aluminum

1966

M/V Micoperi III

13 m h.011

Steel/Aluminum

M/V Micoperi IV

13 m h.012

Steel/Aluminum

Papo

21,03 m h.013

Steel/Aluminum

Desiree

16,8 m h.014

Steel/Aluminum

Lidymar II

16,8 m h.015

Steel/Aluminum

1967

M/V Fina IV

18,25 m h.016

Steel/Aluminum

Lauramar

21,61 m h.018

Steel/Aluminum

Bali Hai

21,61 m h.019

Steel/Aluminum

New Caravelle

21,61 m h.020

Steel/Aluminum

Charleston II

21,61 m h.021

Steel/Aluminum

1968

M/V Lina

13 m h.022

Steel/Aluminum

M/V Micoperi 9

13 m h.023

Steel/Aluminum

Vima II

21,61 m h.024

Steel/Aluminum

Micoperi II

14,65 m h.025

Steel/Aluminum

1969

Beluga

21,61 m h.026

Steel/Aluminum

Lucy Three

21,61 m h.027

Steel/Aluminum

M/V Vina Del Mar

21,61 m h.030

Steel/Aluminum

Begheera

38,4 m h.031

Steel/Aluminum

1970

In the ’70s, CRN yachts’ signature lines became a leitmotif that has endured to the present day. The boats continued inexorably to grow, often anticipating the needs of an increasingly complex market. Sanzio Nicolini and Carlo Riva began to collaborate to great effect. Between 1970 and 1978, CRN also built eight vessels for Riva: six Marco Polos, inspired by the Super Conero, and two Vespuccis, one of which became Carlo Riva’s personal yacht. This partnership between the two great innovators, Nicolini and Riva, was a key moment for their companies and for the Italian pleasure-yacht industry in general. In 1978, CRN built its first yacht of over 45 metres: the 47.2-m Fath Al Khair, for an emir in the Middle East. This was an outlet that continued to develop in the following decade.

CRN M/Y Super Conero

CRN

Steel/Aluminum

CRN M/Y Conero

CRN

Steel/Aluminum

Golondrina

21,61 m h.032

Steel/Aluminum

Santa Cruz

21,61 m h.033

Steel/Aluminum

Marco Polo

21,61 m h.034

Steel/Aluminum

Luisito

26,82 m h.040

Steel/Aluminum

Annolina

26,8 m h.041

Steel/Aluminum

1971

Detective

23,8 m h.044

Steel/Aluminum

Nerine

29,5 m h.045

Steel/Aluminum

1972

Acali II

26,8 m h.047

Steel/Aluminum

Gazella (Active Gazella)

30,8 m h.048

Steel/Aluminum

Vespucci

30 m h.049

Steel/Aluminum

1973

TR Sempione

54 m h.050

Steel/Aluminum

Santa Cruz II

28 m h.051

Steel/Aluminum

Moneikos

35 m h.052

Steel/Aluminum

Withe Lady

28 m h.053

Steel/Aluminum

Esmeralda II

28 m h.054

Steel/Aluminum

Aruba

35 m h.055

Steel/Aluminum

1975

L'Orca Two

28,6 m h.056

Steel/Aluminum

Santa Cruz III

36 m h.058

Steel/Aluminum

Caribe

36 m h.059

Steel/Aluminum

Maria Del Mar (Leocrie II)

39,6 m h.060

Steel/Aluminum

Argolide

32,5 m h.062

Steel/Aluminum

1978

Fath Al Khair

47,2 m h.070

Steel/Aluminum

1979

Santa Maria

48 m h.071

Steel/Aluminum

1980

CRN’s clients in the '80s were mostly Greek owners and Middle Eastern royalty, who sought increasingly large yachts, now ranging from 32 to 61 metres in length. 1983 was a pivotal time in CRN’s history. This was the year when CRN delivered the F100, a 32.8-metre yacht designed by Gerhard Gilgenast for Gianni Agnelli, head of the famous Italian car-making dynasty. The F100 was the most advanced vessel that the yard had yet built, foreshadowing a type of yacht that would be all the rage two decades later. Her unmistakable svelte lines by Gilgenast helped to launch the “minimalist” movement in contemporary yacht design. She was an extremely robust, comfortable craft well-suited to long cruises in all weathers, the first yacht with floating rubber supports, making for a delightfully quiet ride. This was also the first recreational explorer yacht. Another milestone during these years was the 47-metre Azzurra, constructed for an American client in 1988 with interiors by Paola Smith, a major name in interior design stateside.

TR Brennero

54 m h.063

Steel/Aluminum

Awal

47,2 m h.072

Steel/Aluminum

Meshref

22 m h.075

Steel/Aluminum

1981

Anipage V

32,5 m h.064

Steel/Aluminum

Anastasia TH

42,8 m h.074

Steel/Aluminum

1982

Varmar - (Tyndareo)

42,8 m h.078

Steel/Aluminum

1983

CRN 80 M/Y Shaf

CRN hull 100/80

Steel/Aluminum

CRN 83 M/Y F100

CRN hull 100/83

Steel/Aluminum

f100In 1983, CRN delivered the F100, a 32.8-metre yacht designed by Gerhard Gilgenast for Gianni Agnelli, head of the famous Italian car-making dynasty. It was an adventure that defined CRN’s future and gave the company huge impetus. The F100 was the most advanced vessel that the yard had yet built; she foreshadowed a type of yacht that would be all the rage twenty years later. Her unmistakable svelte lines by Gilgenast helped to launch the “minimalist” movement in contemporary yacht design. She was an extremely robust, comfortable craft well-suited to long cruises in all weathers, the first yacht with floating rubber supports for a delightfully quiet ride. This was also the first recreational explorer yacht. The F100’s groundbreaking design would prove inspirational, paving the way for many others to follow.

New Santa Mary

53,3 m h.077

Steel/Aluminum

Akitou

52,8 m h.080

Steel/Aluminum

1984

TR Renzo

32 m h.086

Steel/Aluminum

TR Lucia

32 m h.087

Steel/Aluminum

1985

CRN 92 M/Y Jameel

CRN hull 100/92

Steel/Aluminum

TR Tonale

54 m h.082

Steel/Aluminum

TR S.Marco

32 m h.090

Steel/Aluminum

TR S. Cristoforo

32 m h.091

Steel/Aluminum

1986

CRN 95 M/Y Il Vagabundo

CRN hull 100/95

Steel/Aluminum

TR Lombardia

54 m h.081

Steel/Aluminum

Vanina (Mister P)

32,5 m h.088

Steel/Aluminum

TR Mantova

32 m h.093

Steel/Aluminum

1987

CRN 97 M/Y Nourah of Riyadh

CRN hull 100/97

Steel/Aluminum

TR Plinio

46,3 m h.084

Steel/Aluminum

TR Innominato

32 m h.094

Steel/Aluminum

Abdulaziz

45,25 m h.098

Steel/Aluminum

1988

CRN 99 M/Y Azzurra

CRN hull 100/99

Steel/Aluminum

Azzurra

47,5 m h.099

Steel/Aluminum

1989

TR Dante

46,3 m h.096

Steel/Aluminum

M/V CP 401 - O Cavallari

28,6 m h.101

Steel/Aluminum

M/V CP 402 - R.Pennetti

28,6 m h.102

Steel/Aluminum

1990

CRN’s clients were mostly from the Middle East, a region that had entered a period of unprecedented turmoil, starting with the Gulf War as the decade dawned. CRN elected to diversify its operations to include refitting and the purely commercial side. Vessels of considerable size were launched, including Awal II (65 metres, 1990), Maracunda (50 metres, 1990), Lady Anne PB (40 metres, 1994), Pegaso (48 metres, 1996), Sahab IV (50 metres, 1997), Pestifer (50 metres, 1998) and Numptia (61 metres, 2000), the last craft to be made by CRN during this decade, coinciding with the change in ownership that was bound to alter the Shipyard’s destiny. Numptia featured a decidedly ‘rounded stern, designed by CRN in cooperation with Studio Scanu, which made it immediately famous throughout the world.

CRN 108 M/Y Maracunda

CRN hull 108

Steel/Aluminum

M/V CP 404 - W.Facchin

28,6 m h.103

Steel/Aluminum

M/V CP 403 - G. Magliano

28,6 m h.104

Steel/Aluminum

Maracunda

49,95 m h.105

Steel/Aluminum

1991

CRN 100 M/Y Awal II

CRN hull 100/100

Steel/Aluminum

1992

M/V CP 409- G.Ingianni

34,63 m h.110

Steel/Aluminum

1993

Azzurra II

54,65 m h.107

Steel/Aluminum

1994

CRN 111 M/Y Lady Anne

CRN hull 111

Steel/Aluminum

1996

CRN 108 M/Y Pegaso

CRN hull 108

Steel/Aluminum

1997

CRN 112 M/Y Sahab IV

CRN hull 112

Steel/Aluminum

1998

CRN 114 M/Y Pestifer

CRN hull 114

Steel/Aluminum

2000

In 2002 CRN reached a new milestone which would further enhance its know-how and production capacity: the acquisition of the adjacent shipyard Mario Morini, a historical name in shipbuilding. Morini’s experience in steel construction, gained through its production of commercial, merchant and military vessels, perfectly matched CRN’s needs and the union between the two shipyards led to the creation of an impressive operation with an 80-thousand-square-metre site with a large private marine andbecoming one of the largest shipyard in Europe. In this step CRN has further expanded its portfolio and diversified its production, to combine its traditional steel and aluminium vessels with new composite ones. And it was so that CRN’s successful composite megayacht lines 128’ (40 metres) and Navetta 43 (43 metres) were born. Up to five pleasure vessels were now being launched every year and CRN’s fleet was growing fast, together with its fame. Kooilust Mare (2003) and Saramour (2005) were two 46-metre yachts inspired by Magnifica, once again designed by Nuvolari & Lenard, and the idea of ‘fully-custom’ megayachts, built on the same naval platform, was now beginning to take on. It was then that the cooperation with architectural firm Zuccon International Project began, the first result of which was 54m Ability in 2006. Other yachts built in the following years included Givi (60 metres – in 2007), Maraya (54 metres – in 2007), Romance (57 metres - in 2008), Tacanuyaso MS (60 metres – in 2008), Blue Eyes (60 metres – in 2009), Mimtee (60 metres – in 2010) and Darlings Danama (60 metres – in 2011).

Nvmptia

61m

Steel/Aluminum

2001

Magnifica

43m

Steel/Aluminum

2003

Clarena

46m

Steel/Aluminum

2004

Ariela

39,6 m 128#01

Composite

XS of London

39,6 m 128#02

Composite

2005

Saramour

46m

Steel/Aluminum

2006

GiVi

60m

Steel/Aluminum

Ability

54m

Steel/Aluminum

Anne Marie

39,6 m 128#03

Composite

2007

Emerald Star

43m

Composite

Sima

39,6 m 128#04

Composite

2008

128'

40m

Composite

Hana

43m

Composite

Tacanuyaso

60m

Steel/Aluminum

Romance

57m

Steel/Aluminum

Maraya

54m

Steel/Aluminum

Lady Belmor

39,6 m 128#05

Composite

2009

Blue Eyes

60m

Steel/Aluminum

Sofico

43m

Composite

Rubeccan

43m

Composite